Floating Candleholders By Israel Dahan

Floating Candleholders By Israel Dahan

  • $3,191.00
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These minimalist candleholders extract the millennia-old tradition of lighting candles on the eve of the Sabbath to its pure essence. Two small glass cups are clinched by silver rings, each attached to a pair of delicate stainless steel rods set on a bronze base. The glass cups holding the flame hover in the air, taking on a life of their own, striving upwards. The object is neither candleholder nor candle: it is a new creation: ephemeral light itself, embodying the spirit of the ritual.

Materials: Silver, bronze, stainless steel, glass
Dimensions: 20.8/55.1/208.6 in each

 

One of the most widespread Jewish rituals that has been upheld throughout the world for thousands of years is the lighting of Shabbat candles. From generation to generation, Shabbat candles have been lit on Friday evening before sunset to usher in the Jewish Sabbath. The candles are traditionally lit by the woman of the household. After lighting the candles, the woman moves her hands over the candles and towards herself in a circular motion, as if “bringing in” or “guiding in" the Sabbath, and then covers her eyes with her hands and recites a blessing. The lighting of Shabbat candles serves a dual purpose: to honor the Shabbat (kavod Shabbat), and to bring domestic peace (shlom bayit) , light and harmony to the home. To this day, many people conceive of this ritual as symbolizing family unity, and the presence of Shabbat candleholders in the home symbolizes the ritual of domestic peace.
In this work, Dahan designed two small glass cups clinched by silver rings, each one attached to a pair of delicate stainless steel rods set on a bronze base. The glass cups holding the flame hover in the air; their height is adjustable. Unlike many conventional Shabbat candlesticks which are heavily embellished cast metals, these candles are essentially pure, ephemeral light. The physical, tangible elements of the candleholders are honed down to the bare minimum that is needed to hold the flame in the air. The flame, in turn, takes on a life of its own, striving upwards like a musical note lingering in the air. This object is neither candleholder nor candle; it is a new creation, the essence of light.

 

 

 Israel Dahan

Born in a village in Morocco in 1944, Israel Dahan immigrated to Israel as a teenager and studied the art of the goldsmith at the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem. Dahan creates his objects in keeping with Halacha (Jewish religious law), but his pieces are far from conventional: he provides new interpretations for traditional objects, maintaining a delicate balance between his drive to create and innovate while ensuring that his pieces fulfill their traditional role in ritual. His pieces manifest the ceremonious act in which they play a part, as special attention is given to the way they are held, used, and laid to rest: actions crystallized in tangible form.

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