Floating Menorah By Israel Dahan

Floating Menorah By Israel Dahan

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This Menorah articulates the role it plays during the week of Hannukah, when Menorahs are placed on windowsills visible from the street in order to spread light out to the world. By means of an innovative design incorporating glass vials, oil, silver chains and magnets, this weightless, ephemeral Menorah is transformed into an entirely new object: one that echoes the familiar, traditional form while extracting its ritualistic essence and stripping away all excess.

Materials: Silver, glass, oil, silver chain. 

 

During the eight days of Hanukkah, around the world Jewish households place the Menorah on a windowsill visible from the street to spread light to the world and remind passersby of the miracle of Hanukkah. The holiday week in Jerusalem is an especially festive time, as the multitudes of Menorahs shining from every window mingle with the flames’ reflections to create a magnificent display of flickering light. In this piece, Dahan has designed a Menorah that articulates the role it plays in this spectacle, in effect merging the Menorah with the window where it is traditionally placed. The result is an entirely new object, one that echoes the familiar, traditional form while extracting  its ritualistic essence and stripping away all excess.

The Floating Menorah is composed of nine small glass cups that hold oil, each clinched by a ring of silver. The rings are attached to a small magnet, whose “partner” is placed on the other side of the windowpane. The magnets hold in place the flames, which seem to be hovering in mid-air. The silver rings are linked by means of delicate silver chains, hanging, weightless, outlining the form of the Menorah as an intangible , abstract memory. By means of this innovative setup, the Menorah cannot exist without the window; its very existence depends on its role of dispersing light in the world.

Materials:

Silver, glass, oil, silver chain. 

 

 Israel Dahan

Born in a village in Morocco in 1944, Israel Dahan immigrated to Israel as a teenager and studied the art of the goldsmith at the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem. Dahan creates his objects in keeping with Halacha (Jewish religious law), but his pieces are far from conventional: he provides new interpretations for traditional objects, maintaining a delicate balance between his drive to create and innovate while ensuring that his pieces fulfill their traditional role in ritual. His pieces manifest the ceremonious act in which they play a part, as special attention is given to the way they are held, used, and laid to rest: actions crystallized in tangible form.

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